Fictional Corrections Policy

CAMP PUBLISHERS CORRECTIONS POLICY

In the case of an error that stands as a correction with a source, misinterpretation, or wrongful wordplay, our managing editorial team shall review all corrections before publications.

If an error is found, the following procedure is to be undergone:

  • The issue will be brought up to the editorial staff here at CAMP PUBLISHERS.
  • After looking over the issue, the error will then be brought to the original publisher of the article
  • The issue will then be posted on the “corrections” tab on the website, and addressed the following day in the “corrections” box on Pg. 4 of the newspaper

The source of error will be determined at the end of the solution as wither an editing error that was bypassed in the process of editing such as a typographical error, or because of a weak or outdated source.

Exceptions for errors include:

  • A Head Editor being able to make correction directly in online copy

Our publication DOES NOT allow the use of scrubbing. We stand by the pieces that we publish and are confident in the true and ethical journalism that goes forth behind it.

Our ombudsman will be the frontman of all presentations of corrections for the publication. Under him/her will be the power to determine what will be a correction and what won’t be.

Video Project: Why do we listen to music?

Alright, so for my final project, I wanted to get into as to why people listen to music. It’s a very simple question, yes, but there isn’t a simple answer. The main focus was to try and to get into the scientific-aspect of why people listen to music.

So, as stated, there are five main reasons as to why people listen to music. These are curtesy of Counsel&Heal.

1. Eases pain

According to a study from the Frontiers in Psychology journal, researchers found that patients with fibromyalgia who listened to music that they liked experienced less pain and had increased motor ability than when they listened to pink noise, also know as flicker noise. The music was played at a slower rate of less than 120 beats per minute.

2. Helps with focus

If you need to focus, try listening to music specific to the late baroque period. Researchers from the Stanford University School of Medicine discovered that music led to brain changes that boosted attention and memory. The study was published in 2007.

3. Increases exercise performance

Many fitness experts have recommended people to create a playlist that can energize the body. In several studies, researchers have concluded that fast, upbeat music can push people to workout harder and make the workout more enjoyable.

4. Boosts mood

A 2011 study published in Nature Neuroscience found that classical music can trigger the brain to release dopamine, which improves mood and can make you feel happier.

5. Soothes

If you have had a stressful day and want to calm down, try listening to mellow music. A study conducted in 2013 and published in Ergonomics found that listening to mellow music could effectively reduce road rage. 

review.jpg

I’ve always wondered as to why, at any given date and moment, I was listening to the music I was listening to. After doing my research, I conducted my own study as to when I listened to music and what I was feeling, along with the genre.

In the morning: I was listening to indie music (no surprise). Indie music, most of which I listen to from California-based bands, gets me into the feeling that summer brings. With my friends, cruising down the shore back at home, and hitting the beach. I felt as if I was listening this music because it takes me away from the reality of my early classes. Every morning that passed by, means that I’m one morning closer to being back in Seaside for work, and the beach with friends.

In the afternoon: I tended to listen to a lot of rap and music with heavy beats and fast lyrics. I get most of my classes done (except for a Wednesday night class) by 4:30 P.M, and I love to workout, so this music got me ready for my workouts. I usually will play this really loud in my headphones, so that I really get taken away and get the right mindset for my workout.

In the evening: Pop, and whatever is going around on the charts. At night, all of my roommates are at the apartment, along with a friend or two. So we will all hangout in the living room and get dinner and play xbox or watch tv. There’s never a moment where music isn’t playing. I feel like this music brings a lot of people together, or at least does that to us. I get a great vibe and always feel “at home,” even though I’m 100 miles away from the homeland.

All in all, I loved this topic, and the science behind why we listen to music. This blog has taught me a lot not only about music and society, but about myself as well. I really found what I love to do as a hobby, and that’s listening to music. With the research and study I did, I also found why I listen to what I do, and what moods coincide with my choice of genre.

Sources:

http://syncproject.co/blog/why-do-we-listen-to-music

http://www.counselheal.com/articles/13696/20141128/five-reasons-why-you-should-listen-to-music.htm

Aretha Franklin National Anthem Thanksgiving Football

The Science of Goosebumps and Music Chills

Young the Giant: In My Home (Audio)

MAKING STRANGERS HAPPY

How Music Affects Your Brain

My Wife and Kids – Euro Training – Terry Crews

https://www.theodysseyonline.com/weeks-worth-underrated-weeknd-songs

http://www.gridgit.com/post_infographics-and-applying-with-a-job_1192704/

Dave Matthews Band & Michael J. Fox jam out at charity event

Dave Matthews Band performed at the “A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to Cure Parkinson’s: An Evening of Comedy & Music,” charity event on November 12. The event, as stated in its title, had all funds go towards Parkinson’s disease.

Michael J. Fox, well-known for his role as Marty in Back To The Future, was diagnosed with Parkinson’s in 1991. His research and funding towards the diseased started in 2000.

As Dave Matthews and co. took the stage, they were welcomed and joined by Fox, who took his guitar-playing skills and performed with the group. The band performed “All Along The Watchtower,” inspired by Bob Dylan’s famous “Watchtower.”

Fox would add riffs and hit some nice solos in the performance, as it would bring nothing less than a smile to Dave Matthews’ face, and to those watching along with him.

“This is not the first time Fox has taken the stage with a famous band this year. In July, he performed the Penguins’ “Earth Angel” and Chuck Berry’s “Johnny B. Goode” – both of which Fox played years before in the movie Back to the Future”- Rolling Stone

The benefit would raise over $5 million, and raised the hopes of research towards the unfortunate disease as well.

“It’s grown in amazing ways with the amount of people in the greater Parkinson’s community – and outside of it – who come out and support us,” Fox noted before Saturday’s benefit. “It’s humbling every year.” – Rolling Stone

Bad Suns new album “Disappear Here” takes sophomore slump out of discussion

After tagging along with pop-singer/songwriter Halsey, Bad Suns broke news of their second studio album titled “Disappear Here.” They released a title-named song, and immediately showed the road they are taking, and the identity they want to behold.

Before releasing this new album, Bad Suns were taking the industry bit by bit. Their song “Cardiac Arrest” gaining a huge draw from people around the world, and was even preformed on “Conan.” But, in an interview with Billboard, the group were about to call it quits, and start over entirely with a new identity.

Their debut album, “Language & Perspective,” featured the hit song. The record goes through the band’s struggle of trying to make a impact in the music industry. It’s music at its purest form.

With “Cardiac Arrest,” it was more of a last lick of trying to get out there. In that interview, Christo Brown, the frontman of the group, said: “We put [‘Cardiac Arrest’] online saying, ‘This is what we’ve been working on for so long, hope you guys like it at least,'” he says. “We were expecting to put [Bad Suns] to rest after releasing the song, just to show what we were doing and then start a new project.”

The exact opposite happened. Labels and those in the industry took notice, which led to their success and the new album “Disappear Here.” Alternative Press wrote a review touching on the album and the band’s success in creating a name for themselves. “The track (Disappear Here) opens the record with a reassuring blend of post-punk melodies and ’80s new wave guitar work, all masterfully crafted through a modern pop lens.” This is what the band has created. It’s such a refreshing mix of different genres all in one.

“Disappear Here, the newest album by California alt-rock band Bad Suns, sounds like it was created for sunset drives down winding roads. The follow-up to 2014’s Language and Perspective, it takes the listener on a journey through a myriad of sonic landscapes, making stops along the way to marvel at both the beauty and the harsh truth of the universe. Some of its tracks are wistful laments of good times gone wrong; others are upbeat celebrations of life. All thirteen of them shine with insight, honesty and enough rock-and-roll confidence to convince listeners that Bad Suns is a band to be watched.” – TheYoungFolks.com

After such a successful first impact with appearances on “Conan,” touring with Halsey, and even The 1975, Bad Suns are now on watch. I recently started listening to them on Spotify, and I can’t get enough. They are exactly what you want in an indie/ alt. rock band, or really just music in general. They generate so much energy throughout their music, that it spreads into listener’s ears as some really great stuff. If you love the feeling you get while cruising through the beach or town with your windows down, Bad Suns give you just that with their music.

Video Post: Incubus

So, for this week’s post, I decided to go with my favorite band of all time; Incubus.

Of course, they are a California-based band. I don’t know why that seems to be my personal go-to. Nonetheless, I decided to take some videos and instead of just finding the specific shots and camera angles to be used, I created my own music video with it all.

Enjoy!

Tom DeLonge has always been insane

If you know of Tom DeLonge, you know that he was part of the legendary rock band Blink-182. You know that he’s broken the band apart a couple times, and has been in other groups such as Box Car Racer, and since 2010, Angels And Airwaves. What you might also be fond of, is his obsession of extraterrestrial life.

DeLonge has more often than not been a hot take in the news for this interest he has in alien life. Weird? Yes. But, who hasn’t thought of these things before? I used to want to be an astronaut and absolutely loved aliens and space. Tom is bringing our childhood thought-process into adulthood, and making some kind of conversation with it.

Blink-182 literally produced a song titled “Aliens Exist” back in 2005 written by DeLonge.

“What if people knew that these were real
I’d leave my closet door open all night
I know the CIA would say
What you hear is all hearsay
I wish someone would tell me what was right” – Aliens Exist, Blink-182

DeLonge has always brought a type of style to his music that really makes you feel a sensation as if you were actually flying in a sense. A type of feeling as if you are in a spaceship or somewhere that isn’t Earth. The continuous strum-pattern that he brought to many of songs (which people often criticize his groups for sounding the same with most songs) gives this effect. If you listen to AVA’s (Angels and Airwaves) first album “We Don’t Need To Whisper,” you can hear just that in 9 of the 10 total tracks.

Oh, and every cover-art for AVA displays a space-styled scene. Just in case you were wondering. Here’s a sample:

ava-2

It is what has been in the news recently about the artist, though, that has supports like myself saying “wow, this guy really never stops.” But, this is why we, or at least I, admire the guy. He never stops what he loves. According to RollingStone, and a WikiLeakes reveal, DeLonge legitimately emailed Democratic Presidential Nominee Hillary Clinton’s chairman John Podesta about extraterrestrial lifeforms.

In the Podesta emails leaked by Wikileaks, DeLonge reached out to Clinton’s campaign chairman in an effort to set up a Washington, D.C. meeting between them and two people “in charge of most fragile divisions, as it relates to Classified Science and DOD topics. Other words, these are A-Level officials,” DeLonge wrote back in October 2015. “Podesta, who also served as senior advisor to President Barack Obama, expressed disappointment in February 2015 that his time in the White House didn’t result in the revelation of the existence of UFOs. ‘Finally, my biggest failure of 2014: Once again not securing the #disclosure of the UFO files. #thetruthisstilloutthere, Podesta tweeted.’

In short, DeLonge has put away a lot in his life in order to expand his knowledge and desire to uncover truths about such life. He has broken the infamous Blink-182 up multiple times for reasons pertaining to extraterrestrial discovery, with the last break-up being the absolute end.

Again, I’ve always admired this guy for going against thing sin order to prove what he believes is right and what the public should be allowed to know. In fact, to end this, he actually came to an agreement with Clinton that she will declassify all documents pertaining to extraterrestrials if elected president.

Crazy stuff for most. “The usual,” for Tom DeLonge.

“What seems like ridiculous subject matter to most, is of massive importance to admirable National Security Leadership. It’s easy to poke fun about the topic from an armchair, but unless you’re invited to the meetings I have been a part of, then…no more laughing. Big things are coming. Project is still on, believe it or not, things just got bigger.” – Tom Delonge, RollingStone

 

Audio Post

So, for this week’s post, I wanted to write a little about the alternative/indie rock band Young the Giant. The media upload was put on Soundcloud, and even though it says it’s 2:07 minutes long, it’s really at 2:00 on the dot, as the music fades out and I couldn’t really figure out how to cut some time off. So please donNonetheless, here it is.

 

https://soundcloud.com/jaiden-c-410897782/online-journalism-project-take

Top 5 artists for each of the last 5 decades

This post consisted of five hours of telling myself “no, this were better… wait. Maybe not?” Coming up with the top artist for each of the last 5 decades was challenging. So many names come up. Before we get started, here’s a list of the painfully deserted groups that were left out for each decade.

Runner-Ups

The 60’s: The Beach Boys, The Who, The Rolling Stones

The 70’s: Pink Floyd, Eagles, Elton John, Lynard Skynard

The 80’s: Queen, Madonna, The Police, Prince, Bon Jovi

The 90’s: Red Hot Chili Peppers, Pearl Jam, 2pac, Soundgarden

The 00’s: Blink-182, Eminem, Beyonce, Mariah Carey, The Black Eyed Peas

The 60’s: The Beatles

Paul McCartney, John Lennon, Ringo Starr and George Harrison came together to undoubtably form the most iconic and influential rock band in history. You can even say they were the most influential group period. The group would bag 16 awards with 35 nominations; 10 awards of which were Grammy Awards. They would win “Best New Artist” in 1965, and would win “Song of the Year” in 1967 with “Michelle.” The year after, in 1968, they would add “Album of the Year” with their hit “Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band.”

The 70’s: Billy Joel

Billy Joel took the 70’s into his own hands, creating single after single basically at a days notice. Although he has many, his biggest claim to fame came in 1977 with the album “Stranger.” With a track listing that many can recognize, and our parents & grandparents can probably jam out to at any given time, “Stranger” gave the piano man (pun painfully intended) 4 top-40 tracks. By the end of the year, it peaked at number two and had gone platinum, and within the course of a year, it would spawn the Top 40 singles “Just the Way You Are” (which would win the 1978 Grammy for Record of the Year and Song of the Year), “Movin’ Out (Anthony’s Song),” “She’s Always a Woman,” and “Only the Good Die Young.” Over the next two decades, the album would sell over seven million copies. And, let’s be honest, we all scream “YOU HAD TO BE A BIG SHOT, DIDN’T YOU?” at some point of our lives.

The 80’s: Michael Jackson

The most iconic musician in history. Perhaps the greatest to ever create it. I really don’t know where to start on this one. He entered the music world at the age of 5, ironically as a member of the Jackson 5. The list goes on forever with what the King of Pop received award-wise, and what he did to influence the world. We all know of “Thriller” and the anticipation that the song opens with for a couple minutes. There really isn’t much to write here, because it’s generally known that MJ was the best to do it, so I’ll just leave this chart of winning awards here.

“This was a man who saw the increasingly interconnected world and gave it a music to share – and, he hoped, perhaps even improve each others’ lives with. His tracks Heal the World and Earth Song are often mocked for their tubthumping and mawkish environmentalism, but he was one of the few people who could actually transmit the message he set out to preach; he spoke across language and nation, pre-empting the global culture we share online today.” – Ben Beaumont-Thomas, theguardian.com

American Music Awards
26
Billboard Awards
40
Brit Awards
6
MOBO Awards
1
Grammy Awards
13
Danish Music Awards
2
Guinness World Records
39
MTV VMA Awards
18
Soul Train Awards
12
World Music Awards
16

The 90’s: Nirvana

Although their immense influence in the lives of many came to a tragic end with the death of lead-man Kurt Cobain in 1994, Nirvana has become regarded as one of the most influential and important rock bands of the modern era. With the shocking success of “Smells Like Teen Spirit,” Nirvana followed up with their second album, “Nevermind.” The band sold over 25 million albums in the US alone, and 75 million worldwide, which would put them on a list along with the greatest selling music artists of all time. Nirvana brought a sense of “do what makes you happy. Screw what others think” mentality with their music and media portrayal.

“In the intervening decade, Cobain, a small, frail but handsome man in life, has become an abstract Generation X icon, viewed by many as the ‘last real rock star’ […] a messiah and martyr whose every utterance has been plundered and parsed” – Eric Olsen, MSNBC.

The 00’s: Green Day

Green Day emerged in a time where punk rock music dominated the industry. Blink-182, Sum 41, New Found Glory, Simple Plan, Fall Out Boy, My Chemical Romance. They all ruled the world, and oh man I love them all so much. But Green Day emerged as the top dog in one of the most competitive era’s in music history. The bang broke out in the mid/late 90’s, but regained their fame in the early 2000’s with albums “American Idiot” and “21st Century Breakdown.” American Idiot would open up at #1 on the charts, and would serve as the era’s icon. During this time, it was all about revolution and rebellion. The new generation standing up against the older parents, politicians, and those who seemed to have brought unjustified reasoning into their world. The album depicts modern American life under the control of an idiot ruler who let people be misinformed by the media and a “redneck agenda.” It gives different angles on an everyman, modern icons, and leaders. The album was also released two months before President George W. Bush was reelected, as a callsign of protest. Green Day would win “Favorite Alternate Artist” in 2005 and 2009. The band would total 95 awards won, and 215 nominations. Below is an interview done in 2004 after their release of American Idiot.

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Twenty One Pilots Reach #1 on Billboards Artist 100 Chart; Pay Tribute to MCR

Pop/Rock band Twenty One Pilots have reached the number one spot on Billboards Artist 100 chart for their first time on Thursday.

The duo consisting of Tyler Joseph and Josh Dun have taken the music world by storm. After releasing their first studio album “Vessel” under label Fueled By Ramen, spotlight immediately tagged along. The band struck gold with their second album “Blurryface.”

“People would tell me all the time, ‘You can’t be all things to everyone.’ I would say, ‘I’m not trying to be! I’m being what I want to be for myself.'”- Tyler Joseph in RollingStone interview

Blurryface contained 5 hit singles; “Stressed out,” “Ride,” “Fairly Local,” “Tear in My Heart,” and “Fairly Local.” The album hit Alternative Presses’s “10 Essential Records of 2015” list. Blurryface was nominated for Album Of The Year at the 2016 Alternative Press Music Awards. The album also won the category of “Top Rock Album” at the Billboard Music Awards.

The single “Stressed Out” spoke to an audience that recognizes the end of our individual adolescence, with lyrics “We used to play pretend, give each other different names, We would build a rocket ship and then we’d fly it far away, Used to dream of outer space but now they’re laughing at our face, Saying, ‘Wake up, you need to make money.'”

Twenty One Pilots are known for their creative yet simple ways of bringing out feelings that we all contain, but are too afraid to confront more often than not.

Twenty One Pilots pay tribute to My Chemical Romance

Recently, Joseph and Dun paid tribute to legendary rock band MCR (My Chemical Romance).

About ten years after MCR broke the music world with their third album “Welcome to the Black Parade,” the band leaked a date out on Twitter in which many thought would lead to another album. It turned out to be the 10th anniversary of WTTBP, and the group would release a remastered version including other artists’ covers of the albums hit songs.

Twenty One Pilots would contribute, releasing their cover of MCR’s hit “Cancer” on Twitter, in which those on social media would go absolutely nuts.

This is a very emotional song that puts the singer into a first-person character of a cancer patient which speaks of the struggles of the disease. MCR released the song with more of a “fighting” tempo to it, which a more upbeat style, and tone of voice that represented a patient battling. Twenty One Pilots would take a slower, hip-hop approach to the song. Joseph’s tone of voice is one of a patient losing the battle, the opposite of MCR’s take. The chorus portion of TOP’s take brings a drop of a beat in which will literally give you goosebumps.

The cover of this song was released earlier this September, and only added to TOP’s repertoire.

With two of the hottest albums created, Twenty One Pilots head onto their “Emotional Roadshow” tour lasting from September 30th of this year, to April 8th of next year.

Joseph and Dun have spoken about an up-and-coming album as well. There is no doubt that it will be as good if not better than their first two. The whole world is watching, and can’t wait to see what these guys can produce next for fans.

Q & A: Rap artist Ryan Christensen AKA “Ricky Conaway”

Rap has become a huge part of our generation’s music library. From artists like Future and Drake, to Frank Ocean and Kendrick Lamar, rap has taken world affairs and social conflict into its arms.

I was able to run some questions by up-and-coming rap artist Ryan Christensen, known as “Ricky Conaway.” Christensen is a Toms River, New Jersey native who has been on-the-scene locally for about three years now.

Jaiden Campana: Why did you come to love rap and want to be an artist?

Ryan Christensen: Music has always been a huge influence for me. For as long as I can remember, I’ve had an interest in making my own. I think it’s one of the purest forms of expression. Rap drew me in the most. The lyrics, the beats, the culture. Everything. I’m in love with it.

JC: When did you have that “oh wow, this is what I want to really go after,” moment?

RC: Around 2012 it really dawned on me that rapping is what I was meant to do. Though it took me a very long time to build up the courage to let people hear my music, I always had my mind on it. Once things fell into place, everything was off and running.

JC: Who are your influences, both musically and generally?

RC: Musically, my biggest influences are J Cole, Kendrick Lamar, Drake, Eminem. The list could go on and on. Outside of music, CM Punk is a huge influence on me. The way he carries himself is something I study tremendously, I can appreciate someone like that.

JC: What is the reason behind the rap title of “Ricky Conway”?

RC: To be honest, I hardly even remember choosing my rap name. It was probably back around 2011 that I came up with it. I’ve had plenty of them prior to Ricky Conaway, all too embarrassing to reveal. One thing I do remember is that I wanted to keep the initials of my government name, Ryan Christensen. Ricky Conaway stuck after all of these years.

JC: What do you try to bring to the table when you write up lyrics? Is it more having fun/being serious? 

RC: When I write lyrics, I try to be myself in every way I possibly can. Sometimes I want to have fun, sometimes I want to be serious. It all depends how I’m feeling at the time. Most importantly, though, all I want to do is be authentic.

JC: Would you say being authentic is something that the rap game seems to be missing? Nowadays, it seems like guys can just throw a beat on and repeat one word and make money.

RC: That’s something that seems to be missing in music these days, especially rap. Even in people, in general. That’s one of the most admirable qualities someone can have.

JC: What have you done to promote yourself?

RC: In April of 2015, I released my first portion of music on Soundcloud and YouTube, titled “Attention Everybody.. (Vol. 1.)” Twitter has played a major role in getting myself out there, as well as YouTube. Building relationships with others that share the same interests as you plays an incredible role in promoting anything. On November 25th, I’ll be performing at The Bamboo Bar in Seaside Heights, New Jersey. I’m super excited about it. I’ve got a lot in store for those attending.

JC: How do you feel about the power music? Not just rap, but music as a whole. 

RC: Music has the power to change lives. Both for the artist, and the listener. A lot of the younger generation flocks towards rap as an escape, as an outlet to their day-to-day lives. Sometimes it’s refreshing to get lost in your favorite song, to change something about yourself, to take a look in the mirror and reflect on yourself. Music does that, despite the genre.

JC: So, would you say sharing thoughts in an artistic manner is the best aspect of music?

RC: Yes. Absolutely. Being able to freely express your thoughts is one of the best things about art. It’s your art, no one else’s. Your unique perspective. Music can reflect world issues so beautifully, in it’s rawest form.

JC: Who are your favorite artists that can bring a world issue into the public’s eye? (like Kendrick w/Compton, Macklemore w/ gay and equal rights)

RC: Kendrick Lamar and Macklemore have done a tremendous job at bringing important world issues that often get swept under the rug, to light. When an artist is passionate about an issue, the listener can feel it. J Cole does an amazing job at portraying his thoughts on world issues, especially the BLM [Black Lives Matter] movement. I love everything he is doing. Same goes for Frank Ocean, YG, Vic Mensa, all kinds of artists. People are listening, the influence music has is beautiful.

JC: What are some things that you have learned from about yourself through writing music?

RC: Writing music has taught me a lot about myself, things I never knew before. What I can express, how dig I can deep. It’s essential to my daily routine at this point. Performing is indescribable. I can’t think of anything parallel to performing. I believe that you don’t really know yourself until the pressure is on, and the lights are shining.

JC: You have to be a great student when it comes to public speaking. How do you become so comfortable putting your own content out there, and performing in front of people?

RC: The thing about performing is that it isn’t necessarily a natural thing for everybody. It wasn’t for me, at first. It’s something you have to grow accustomed to, which is similar to nearly everything in life. You have to make adjustments, you have to come accustomed.

JC: Lastly, what do you tell people when you present your music, and what is your message to those that are going after rap and music in general as well?

RC: When presenting music, or any kind of art, it’s important to be as comfortable as you can be, regardless of the situation. No matter how long that takes. Again, it’s about making adjustments. Things aren’t always going to fall into place the way you expect them to, and that’s okay. If everything went the way we expected, life would be boring. Stepping outside of your comfort zone and getting used to things you haven’t experienced before is something I think everybody should undergo. Being yourself is something I preach to everybody, especially with music. When something isn’t authentic, people can see through it. Nothing is going to be perfect at the beginning, working hard is the only way to progress. Most of all, you have to believe in yourself. People give up on their dreams too quick when things don’t go as planned. Keep pushing, keep faith, and remember to breathe.

Christensen recently released his new [explicit] mixtape on September 23rd, 2016, titled “Drugs I Don’t Do, Women I Don’t Know, and Money I Don’t Have.” Listen to it here on youtube: